How content is involved in our lives

Social media usage has increased rapidly in the last eleven and a half years. The increase in the number of users of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat and other social media platforms – and the time spent on them – has sparked interest and psychological well-being.

Regardless of the technology,

While the research is still in its early years – Facebook just celebrated its 15th anniversary this year – media psychology researchers are beginning to part ways in which time spent on these platforms affects and does not affect our daily lives. their lives. Social media and relationships A particularly dangerous concern is whether the time spent on social media sites will be consumed in face-to-face time. Fears about social displacement have been going on for a long time, as old as the phone and possibly even older. University of Kansas Relations and Technology Lab director Dr

What about young people?

When it comes to teenagers, a recent study by Jean Twenge, professor of psychology at San Diego State University, and colleagues found that high school seniors going to college in 2016 compared to high school seniors in the late 1980s to parties, the movies, or drive together. face-to-face social interaction such as driving ”. As a group, this decline was attributed to the increased use of digital media. However, at the individual level, more use of social media was positively associated with more personal social interaction. The study also found that adolescents who spend the most time on social media and the least time in face-to-face social interactions report the most loneliness. Hall’s research questions this cultural belief. In one study, participants kept a record of their daily time doing 19 different activities over the weeks, regardless of whether they were asked to avoid using social media. In the weeks when people were off social media, they spent more time browsing the internet, working, cleaning, and doing housework. But in the same periods of abstention, there was no difference between people’s strongest social bonds and the time they spent socializing.

Result?

One possible reason for this is that we tend to interact with our close loved ones in several different ways, such as text messages, emails, phone calls, and face-to-face conversation. What about young people? When it comes to teenagers, a recent study by Jean Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, and colleagues, drive high school seniors in the late 1980s to parties, movies, or together. face-to-face social interaction such as driving ”. As a group, this decline has been linked to increased use of digital media. However, at the individual level, more use of social media was positively associated with more personal social interaction. The study also found that adolescents who spend the most time on social media and the least time in face-to-face social interactions report the most loneliness.

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